The Mary Celeste was an American merchant brigantine that was discovered on December 4, 1872, off the Azores Islands, sailing with no one on board and with her lifeboat missing. The ship was built in 1861 at Spencer’s Island, Nova … Real Name: The Mary Celeste Case: Mysterious Legends Date: December 4, 1872 Location: Atlantic Ocean Details: On the morning of November 5, 1872, Captain Benjamin Briggs, his family, and several crew members went on a voyage from New York to Europe on the ship the Mary Celeste. The Mary Celeste Mystery – Facts and Theories on Mary Celeste One of the most enduring mysteries of the seas first started to unravel in 1872, when a ship was found floating adrift in the Atlantic. The Mary Celeste was a 103 feet brigantine weighing 282 tons, under Captain Benjamin Briggs.Originally built as the Amazon in Nova Scotia in 1861, the ship seemingly had bad luck, and due to numerous negative occurrences, had changed hands several times.It became the Mary Celeste in 1869.. On November 7 1872, the Mary Celeste picked up a cargo of American alcohol (for … (The ship’s name is often incorrectly spelled as Marie Celeste, and for this we must thank Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who wrote a short story based on the mystery.) Speculation concerning sea monsters was easy to dismiss. The fate of the 10 people aboard remains a mystery. Ghost Ships have been a staple for movies, books, folklores, documentaries and pop-culture. The ship continued to sail … Created Date: The Mary Celeste had been equipped with a yawl, and though that term usually describes a type of sailboat, in this case it refers to a ship's rowboat capable of being rigged for sailing. The Mary Celeste, December 5th, 1872. - All the questions we're answering today came from you guys via our Buzzfeed Unsolved Facebook page, our Buzzfeed Unsolved Instagram page, or directly on the video on B.U.N. Ryan and Shane dive into your theories about the Mary Celeste, debate the existence of mermaids, and decide on their pirate names in this week’s post mortem. Here lies the Mary Celeste. The Mary Celeste was a merchant ship that disappeared in November 1872 only to turn up intact on December 4 th 1872, but with the crew forced to abandon ship after being boarded by Daleks missing. 8 The ship also had plenty of provisions, including food and drink, and so it seemed like it was a perfectly safe and comfortable ship to sail aboard and to live aboard. He also told his crew that he would not abandon the ship unless he absolutely had to, in order to save his own life, and that what mattered the most was the voyage. The brigantine Mary Celeste, often misspelled as Marie Celeste, was discovered without her crew midway between the Azores and Lisbon, Portugal, on December 4, 1872.The crew of the ghost ship was never seen or heard from again. Fredrick Solly-Flood, described as a man "whose arrogance and pomposity were inversely proportional to his IQ," was in charge of the Mary Celeste's salvage hearings. How about the crew of the Dei Gratia, the ship which had actually discovered the empty Mary Celeste - perhaps THEY had in reality attacked the Mary Celeste and then pretended to have found her adrift so they could gain money from the salvage? Traces of blood were also discovered. The ship carried 1,701 barrels of poisonous and highly flammable denatured alcohol, supplies, seven crew members, Captain Spooner Briggs, his wife Sarah, and their 2-year-old daughter Sophia. The sea was choppy, but not so much so that the ship was damaged; in fact, when a crew boarded the ship to investigate just why this ship was floating adrift, they found that it was entirely seaworthy and safe to sail. One of his theories was that the crew got drunk off of the alcohol (which was non-potable because it was basically ethanol). When found by the British brigantine Dei Gratia, Mary Celeste was in a disheveled but seaworthy condition, under partial sail; the last log entry was ten days earlier. It was launched in the same year which also happened to be the year when the American Civil War broke out. Could North African pirates have attacked the ship and killed the crew? The disappearance is often called the greatest maritime mystery in history. Theories range from alcoholic fumes, to underwater earthquakes, to waterspouts, to paranormal explanations involving extraterrestrial life, unidentified flying objects (UFOs), sea monsters, and the phenomena of the Bermuda Triangle, although the Mary Celeste is not known to have sailed through the Bermuda Triangle area. The Mary Celeste mystery is perhaps the most mysterious event to happen in open waters that remains unsolved. The alcohol explosion is the most realistic scenario of what happened to The Mary Celeste. Could the sea itself have been behind the mystery? Since the fateful end of the voyage, the ghostly image of the Mary Celeste has been seen floating at sea on a number of different occasions by sea-farers far and wide. The Mary Celeste didn’t always go by that name, she started her life on 18th May 1861 as ‘The Amazon’. One of the most enduring mysteries of the seas first started to unravel in 1872, when a ship was found floating adrift in the Atlantic. The last entry in her log was dated ten days earlier. However, although the maximum amount payable to the crew was $46,000, they were only paid a sixth of that amount, which suggests that perhaps the authorities were not entirely happy with the crew of the Dei Gratia and their explanation for the events aboard the ship. MacGregor thought that the most likely scenario was that Briggs would only have ordered the crew off of the ship whilst they were still within sight of land – so around the 25th of November. One possibility is that the Mary Celeste fell foul of a waterspout, which is basically a tornado at sea, or perhaps a sudden violent seaquake. The attorney-general leading the investigation proposed a logical explanation. Fredrick Solly-Flood, described as a man "whose arrogance and pomposity were inversely proportional to his IQ," was in charge of the Mary Celeste's salvage hearings. The Canadian brigantine Dei Gratia found her in a dishevelled but seaworthy condition under partial sail and with her lifeboat missing. They then fled in a lifeboat. Seven years later, she was transferred to American ownership, and was re-christened as the Mary Celeste . If the Mary Celeste encountered any storms, waterspouts, seaquakes, tsunamis, or rogue waves, Captain Briggs may have thought that the ship was sinking. The Mary Celeste set sail in 1872, aiming to travel from New York to Genoa. Mary Celeste (/ səˈlɛst /) (erroneously referred to as Marie Celeste) was an American merchant brigantine discovered adrift and deserted in the Atlantic Ocean off the Azores Islands on December 4, 1872. The story has been told and re-told in newspapers, magazines, books and novels, with countless theories of what happened to … Mary Celeste Theories The alcohol explosion is the most realistic scenario of what happened to The Mary Celeste. However, tests later showed that it … Even more outlandish is the idea that it was an inside job, with Captain Briggs and his family faking their deaths to claim the salvage money through a co-conspirator. According to some reports, when Mary Celeste was first investigated, strange marks that could have been caused by an axe were found. And when they looked into her history, they found that this had started with her maiden voyage, back in June 1861. Briggs also brought his wife and child along for the voyage, not wanting to leave them alone at home. It didn’t appear that the ship had been damaged by the adverse weather that it had set out in, either, so just what had happened to the crew, the captain’s wife, and the captain’s infant daughter? The story of the brigantine Mary Celeste, found adrift in the Atlantic in 1872 with no sign of the crew, is well known and many theories have been proposed to account for the mystery. It seems that the Mary Celeste is perhaps one of the most enduring sea tales of all time, and until the mystery is solved, it’s likely that we’ll be seeing her for many years to come. Under a new captain, the Amazon sailed to Europe, where she collided with another boat in the English Channel, which sank. The Mary Celeste was one of the first ships of its design to come out of Spencer's Island Nova Scotia, so there may have been some structural flaws that were known to Captain Briggs which lead to his decision to abandon ship. Stemple, is a look at the disappearance of the crew of the Mary Celeste in 1872 in the Atlantic Ocean. 1701 barrels were loaded and on November the 7th, the crew set sail along with their cargo. Published August 10, 2001 Updated August 10, 2001 . There have been many theories on this mystery, some more convincing than others…. Among the many theories explaining the disappearance of the crew of the Mary Celeste, there is also that of an alien kidnapping YET ANOTHER SURVIVOR What really happened on board has also been told to us by the ship’s cook, Mr John Pemberton . This could be a reason why the barrels were found empty. Even if this were true, where are the crew? After a three month long inquiry, which was actually an incredibly long inquiry for the time, no evidence of foul play was found. Perhaps the most convincing theory relates to the ship's cargo of industrial alcohol. Ranging from attacking monsters from the deep sea, piracy and mutiny, and aliens kidnapping to natures wrath. He was the son of a sea captain. A reader has drawn my attention to the difference in dates given for the 'Mary Celeste' and the 'Dei Gracia' met mid ocean. Setting light to the gas caused a huge blast, which sent a ball of flame upwards. The yawl was normally stored atop the main cargo hatch between the two masts, but was gone; and the railings on one side of the ship had been lowered indicating that the yawl had been launched normally. However, it was later found that the stains weren’t blood and the marks […] Instead of wooden barrels, he used cubes of paper. The yawl was normally stored atop the main cargo hatch between the two masts, but was gone; and the railings on one side of the ship had been lowered indicating that the yawl had been launched normally. One lifeboat was gone, but apparently all of the crew's personal belongings were still in place. She changed hands frequently. The ship was built in 1861 at Spencer’s Island, Nova Scotia, Canada, and named the Amazon. The Mary Celeste mystery is perhaps the most mysterious event to happen in open waters that remains unsolved. History. ... Theories Foul Play. Mary Celeste The theories You’ve seen the evidence and you’ve read the theories, so what do you think happened on board the mysterious Mary Celeste? Here are the top ten theories floating out there: 1) Mutiny. ( Archivist /Adobe Stock) The Mary Celeste’s Crew . The attorney-general leading the inquiry fixated on the idea that members of the crew had got violently drunk on the ship's cargo of alcohol, and then massacred everyone else on board before departing on the ship's sole lifeboat. The ship has the length of 30.30 meters or 99.3 feet. Captain Briggs was married to his cousin, Sarah, and had two children with her. The story of the brigantine Mary Celeste, found adrift in the Atlantic in 1872 with no sign of the crew, is well known and many theories have been proposed to account for the mystery. The fate of the 10 people aboard remains a mystery. Either of which may have caused superficial damage and some waterlogging, perhaps making the crew think the ship was about to sink, leading them to make the fatal mistake of clambering onto the lifeboat. However, it was later found that the stains weren’t blood and the marks […] When found by the British brigantine Dei Gratia, Mary Celeste was in a disheveled but seaworthy condition, under partial sail; the last log entry was ten days earlier. The riddle of the Mary Celeste has intrigued and mystified ever since, with numerous competing theories on just what happened to Briggs and the other people on board. Captain Briggs was married to his cousin, Sarah, and had two children with her. Theories on the cause of the disappearance have ranged from cargo fumes to mutiny to (inevitably) alien abduction. Whether due to turbulence or porous barrels, noxious alcoholic fumes may have escaped, either causing a small explosion or making the crew think an explosion was imminent. The story has been told and re-told in newspapers, magazines, books and novels, with countless theories of what happened to … ... Theories Foul Play. It’s been seen on the Atlantic, and has been turned into one of those spooky sea tales that sailors tell one another over a whiskey during a long voyage. Water got on the ship and they tried to pump it out, but they couldn't get all the water so they left in a panic of the ship sinking; A wave could have washed them off the ship; If the Mary Celeste encountered any storms, waterspouts, seaquakes, tsunamis, or rogue waves, Captain Briggs may have thought that the ship was sinking.